wolfSSL at NXP Connects

wolfSSL is at NXP Connects this year! NXP Connects represents the energy, depth, and scope of a large-scale conference designed in a concentrated format to offer a more personalized experience. Combining a wide range of technical sessions, live-demonstrations, panel discussions and networking opportunities at a regional level, attendees can focus their time on embedded solutions that specifically address their current and future designs. For 2019, NXP Connects will be held in Santa Clara, CA.

Where NXP Connects will be held for 2019:
Venue: Hyatt Regency Santa Clara and Convention Center
When: June 12-13
Directions: https://www.hyatt.com/en-US/hotel/california/hyatt-regency-santa-clara/clara/maps-parking-transportation

Stop by to hear more about the wolfSSL embedded SSL/TLS library, the wolfCrypt encryption engine, or to meet the wolfSSL team! Feel free to say hello!

For more information about wolfSSL, its products, or future events, please contact facts@wolfssl.com.

More information about Wireless IoT can be found here: https://www.nxp.com/support/training-events/nxp-connects:NXP-CONNECTS

wolfSSL FIPS-Ready

With the release of wolfSSL 4.0.0, the wolfSSL team has also released a new product: the wolfSSL FIPS Ready library. This product features new, state of the art concepts and technology. In a single sentence, wolfSSL FIPS Ready is a testable and free to download open source embedded SSL/TLS library with support for FIPS validation, with FIPS enabled cryptography layer code included in the wolfSSL source tree. To further elaborate on what FIPS Ready really means, you do not get a FIPS certificate and you are not FIPS approved. FIPS Ready means that you have included the FIPS code into your build and that you are operating according to the FIPS enforced best practices of default entry point, and Power On Self Test (POST).

FIPS validation is a government certification for cryptographic modules that states that the module in question has undergone thorough and rigorous testing to be certified. FIPS validation specifies that a software/encryption module is able to be used within or alongside government systems. The most recent FIPS specification is 140-2, with various levels of security offered (1-5). Currently, wolfCrypt has FIPS 140-2 validation with certificates #2425 and #3389. When trying to get software modules FIPS validated, this is often a costly and time-consuming effort and as such causes the FIPS validated modules to have high price tags.

Since the majority of wolfSSL products use the wolfCrypt encryption engine, this also means that if wolfSSH, wolfMQTT (with TLS support), wolfBoot, and other wolfSSL products in place can be tested FIPS validated code with their software before committing.

wolfSSL FIPS Ready can be downloaded from the wolfSSL download page, here: https://www.wolfssl.com/download/

For more information about wolfSSL and its FIPS Ready initiative, please contact facts@wolfssl.com.

wolfCrypt as an engine for OpenSSL

As many people know, the OpenSSL project is struggling with FIPS, and their new FIPS release is not expected until December 2020. The version of OpenSSL that supports FIPS goes into End Of Life and is no longer supported in December of 2019.

This means that OpenSSL users will not have a supported package for over a year. This is a big issue for companies that rely on security.

 

To fill this breach, wolfSSL has integrated our FIPS certified crypto module with OpenSSL as an OpenSSL engine. This means that:

1. OpenSSL users can get a supported FIPS solution, with packages available up to the 24×7 level,

2. The new wolfCrypt FIPS solution also supports the TLS 1.3 algorithms, so your package can support TLS 1.3,

3. You can support hardware encryption with your package, as the new wolfCrypt solution has full hardware encryption support.

Additionally, should you be using one of the OpenSSL derivatives like BoringSSL, we can also support you.

Contact us at facts@wolfssl.com if you would like to learn more!

We love you.

Team wolfSSL

wolfCrypt FIPS Certificate #3389

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has completed the validation of the wolfCrypt module version 4 for an updated Federal Information and Processing Standards (FIPS) 140-2 certificate in addition to its previous FIPS 140-2 certificate. This new certificate includes updated and more secure algorithms added to the wolfCrypt module's boundary, some of which are listed further below.

FIPS 140-2 is a government standard that specifies a software module is compatible and allowed to be used in government systems. This includes such areas as drone software, government databases, and other high-security/high-power uses.

The new FIPS 140-2 validation has certificate #3389. The Operating Environments (OEs) tested are Ubuntu Linux (16.04) and Windows 10 on Intel Core i5 processors. Full details about the OEs can be found on the CSRC certificate page. Additionally, the certificate also includes the following algorithms: AES (CBC, GCM, CTR, ECB), CVL, Hash DRBG, DSA, DHE, ECDSA (key generation, sign, verify), HMAC, RSA (key generation, sign, verify), SHA-3, SHA-2, SHA-1, and Triple-DES.

For more information about wolfSSL, wolfCrypt, or our FIPS 140-2 validations, please view our resources below.

Other information can be obtained, or questions can also be answered by contacting facts@wolfssl.com.

Need a Secure Bootloader with MISRA C?

wolfBoot is wolfSSL’s portable, OS-agnostic, secure bootloader solution for 32-bit microcontrollers, relying on wolfCrypt for firmware authentication.  wolfBoot also provides firmware update mechanisms.

MISRA C is a set of rules and guidelines for C code targeting Automotive applications.  The focus of the guidelines is on security and safety.

wolfSSL is considering making wolfBoot compliant with the MISRA C standard.  Please let us know if you have an interest in testing this combination.

For questions about wolfBoot or using wolfSSL technology with MISRA C contact us at facts@wolfssl.com.

Download wolfBoot here: https://www.wolfssl.com/download/
More information about MISRA C can be found here: https://misra.org.uk

wolfSSL Contiki OS Port

With every release of the wolfSSL embedded SSL/TLS library, there are multiple feature additions, port additions, and updates. One of the ports that was added to the wolfSSL library recently was a port to Contiki! You can checkout the changes for Contiki in PR #2500 against the contiki-os/contiki github repository!

Contiki is an open source operating system for the Internet of Things. It connects tiny low-cost, low-power microcontrollers to the Internet. Contiki is a perfect match for wolfSSL, which was built for use on embedded and resource-constrained devices with portability in mind. In addition to being highly portable, wolfSSL provides support for the latest and greatest version of the TLS protocol, TLS 1.3! Using the wolfSSL port with your device running Contiki will allow your IoT device to connect to the internet in one of the most secure ways possible.

The Contiki port in wolfSSL is activated by using the "WOLFSSL_CONTIKI" macro when compiling wolfSSL. An example of this on embedded devices would be placing WOLFSSL_CONTIKI into a user_setttings.h file, or by including the option CPPFLAGS="-DWOLFSSL_CONTIKI" if compiling wolfSSL by using autotools.

For more information, please contact facts@wolfssl.com.

Resources
The most recent version of wolfSSL can be downloaded from our download page, here: https://www.wolfssl.com/download/
wolfSSL support for TLS 1.3: https://www.wolfssl.com/docs/tls13/
Contiki OS homepage: http://www.contiki-os.org

libwebsockets with wolfSSL

We have had a few inquiries about using the wolfSSL embedded SSL/TLS library with secure web sockets lately, and wanted to inform our community that the libwebsockets team has successfully tested with wolfSSL through use of wolfSSL's OpenSSL compatibility layer. The wolfSSL compatibility layer allows for drop-in replacement of OpenSSL resulting in not only a much smaller footprint but very competitive speeds when using the Single Precision Math and/or other optimizations supported by wolfSSL (contact facts@wolfssl.com for more info on Single Precision and other cryptographic optimizations). The libwebsockets team has posted a basic guide for getting started with wolfSSL at the following link: https://libwebsockets.org/lws-api-doc-master/html/md_READMEs_README_8build.html#wolf.

For more information about wolfSSL or one of its products, please contact facts@wolfssl.com. For basic technical questions and information you can reach our pre-sales technical staff at support@wolfssl.com.

wolfSSL at Wireless IoT 2019

wolfSSL is at Wireless IoT this year! Wireless IoT focuses on mobile infrastructure and new trends in wireless technology, products, services and solutions. Explore IoT and digitization at large and exchange the latest with your peers concerning 3G, 4G, LTE, LAN, Bluetooth, LPWA, edge computing and Society 5.0. For 2019, Wireless IoT will be held in Tokyo, Japan.

Where Wireless IoT will be held for 2019:
Venue: Tokyo Big Sight West 3.4 Hall / Conference Building
wolfSSL Booth #: 1223
When: May 29-31
Directions: http://www.bigsight.jp/access/transportation/index.html

Stop by our booth to hear more about the wolfSSL embedded SSL/TLS library, the wolfCrypt encryption engine, to meet the wolfSSL team, or to get some free stickers and swag!

For more information about wolfSSL, its products, or future events, please contact facts@wolfssl.com.

More information about Wireless IoT can be found here: http://www8.ric.co.jp/expo/wj/

CURL 7.65.0 DANCES IN

author: Daniel Stenberg

After another eight week cycle was been completed, curl shipped a new release into the world. 7.65.0 brings some news and some security fixes but is primarily yet again a set of bug-fixes bundled up. Remember 7.64.1?

As always, download it straight from curl.haxx.se!

One fun detail on this release: we have 500 less lines of source code in the lib/ directory compared to the previous release!

Things that happened in curl since last release:

Numbers

the 181st release
3 changes
56 days (total: 7,733)
119 bug fixes (total: 5,148)
215 commits (total: 24,326)
0 new public libcurl function (total: 80)
1 new curl_easy_setopt() option (total: 267)
0 new curl command line option (total: 221)
50 contributors, 24 new (total: 1,953)
32 authors, 12 new (total: 681)
2 security fixes (total: 89)
350 USD paid in Bug Bounties

News

  1. libcurl has deprecated support for the global DNS cache.
  2. Pipelining support is now completely removed from curl.
  3. CURLOPT_MAXAGE_CONN is a new option that controls how long to keep a live connection in the connection cache for reuse.

Security

This release comes with fixes for two separate security problems. Both rated low risk. Both reported via the new bug bounty program.

CVE-2019-5435 is an issue in the recently introduced URL parsing API. It is only a problem in 32 bit architectures and only if an application can be told to pass in ridiculously long (> 2GB) strings to libcurl. This bug is similar in nature to a few other bugs libcurl has had in the past, and to once and for all combat this kind of flaw libcurl now (in 7.65.0 and forward) has a “maximum string length” limit for strings that you can pass to it using its APIs. The maximum size is 8MB. (The reporter was awarded 150 USD for this find.)

CVE-2019-5436 is a problem in the TFTP code. If an application decides to uses a smaller “blksize” than 504 (default is 512), curl would overflow a buffer allocated on the heap with data received from the server. Luckily, very few people actually download data from unknown or even remote TFTP servers. Secondly, asking for a blksize smaller than 512 is rather pointless and also very rare: the primary point in changing that size is to enlarge it. (The reporter was awarded 200 USD for this find.)

Bug-fixes

Over one hundred bug-fixes landed in this release, but some of my favorites from release cycle include…

mark connection for close on TLS close_notify

close_notify is a message in the TLS protocol that means that this connection is about to close. In most circumstances that message doesn’t actually provide information to curl that is needed, but in the case the connection is closed prematurely, understanding that this message preceded the closure helps curl act appropriately. This change was done for the OpenSSL backend only as that’s where we got the bug reported and worked on it this time, but I think we might have reasons to do the same for other backends going forward!

show port in the verbose “Trying …” message

The verbose message that says “Trying 12.34.56.78…” means that curl has sent started a TCP connect attempt to that IP address. This message has now been modified to also include the target port number so when using -v with curl 7.65.0, connecting to that same host for HTTPS will instead say “Trying 12.34.56.78:443…”.

To aid debugging really. I think it gives more information faster at a place you’re already looking.

new SOCKS 4+5 test server

The test suite got a brand new SOCKS server! Previously, all SOCKS tests for both version 4 and version 5 were done by firing up ssh (typically openssh). That method was decent but made it hard to do a range of tests for bad behavior, bad protocol replies and similar. With the new custom test server, we can basically add whatever test we want and we’ve already extended the SOCKS testing to cover more code and use cases than previously.

SOCKS5 user name and passwords must be shorter than 256

curl allows user names and passwords provided in URLs and as separate options to be more or less unrestricted in size and that include if the credentials are used for SOCKS5 authentication – totally ignoring the fact that the protocol SOCKS5 has a maximum size of 255 for the fields. Starting now, curl will return an error if the credentials for SOCKS5 are too long.

Warn if curl and libcurl versions do not match

The command line tool and the library are independent and separable, as in you can run one version of the curl tool with another version of the libcurl library. The libcurl API is solid enough to allow it and the tool is independent enough to not restrict it further.

We always release curl the command line tool and libcurl the library together, using the same version number – with the code for both shipped in the same single file.

There should rarely be a good reason to actually run curl and libcurl with different versions. Starting now, curl will show a little warning if this is detected as we have learned that this is almost always a sign of an installation or setup mistake. Hopefully this message will aid people to detect the mistake earlier and easier.

Better handling of “–no-” prefixed options

curl’s command line parser allows users to switch off boolean options by prefixing them with dash dash no dash. For example we can switch off compressed responses by using “–no-compression” since there regular option “–compression” switches it on.

It turned out we stripped the “–no-” thing no regarding if the option was boolean or not and presumed the logic to handle it – which it didn’t. So users could actually pass a proxy string to curl with the regular option “–proxy” as well as “–no-proxy”. The latter of course not making much sense and was just due to an oversight.

In 7.65.0, only actual boolean command line options can be used with “–no-“. Trying it on other options will cause curl to report error for it.

Add CURLUPART_ZONEID to the URL API

Remember when we added a new URL parsing API to libcurl back in 7.62.0? It wasn’t even a year ago! When we did this, we also changed the internals to use the same code. It turned out we caused a regression when we parsed numerical IPv6 addresses that provide the zone ID within the string. Like this: “https://[ffe80::1%25eth0]/index.html”

Starting in this release, you can both set and get the zone ID in a URL using the API, but of course setting it doesn’t do anything unless the host is a numeric IPv6 address.

parse proxy with the URL parser API

We removed the separate proxy string parsing logic and instead switched that over to more appropriately use the generic URL parser for this purpose as well. This move reduced the code size, made the code simpler and makes sure we have a unified handling of URLs! Everyone is happy!

longer URL schemes

I naively wrote the URL parser to handle scheme names as long as the longest scheme we support in curl: 8 bytes. But since the parser can also be asked to parse URLs with non-supported schemes, that limit was a bit too harsh. I did a quick research, learned that the longest currently registered URI scheme is 36 characters (“microsoft.windows.camera.multipicker”). Starting in this release , curl accepts URL schemes up to 40 bytes long.

Coming up next

There’s several things brewing in the background that might be ready to show in next release. Parallel transfers in the curl tool and deprecating PolarSSL support seem likely to happen for example. Less likely for this release, but still being worked on slowly, is HTTP/3 support.

We’re also likely to get a bunch of changes and fine features we haven’t even thought about from our awesome contributors. In eight weeks I hope to write another one of these blog posts explaining what went into that release…

Beta Testing wolfSSL Integration Into Apache

You can be a part of the new industry-changing port that integrates wolfSSL into Apache! The port of the wolfSSL embedded SSL/TLS library to be used with the Apache web server is nearing the point of Beta testing and we will be looking for user feedback. Development branches of the work have a basic connection being established and working, along with being able to stand up to a basic TLS test probe of the web server when running. Additional features such as OCSP stapling use and more testing is underway. If interested in getting a Beta version of wolfSSL’s integration to Apache contact us at facts@wolfssl.com.

Here are a few of the many reasons why someone should choose to use wolfSSL with their Apache server: we have FIPS validated code for use with projects that have FIPS requirements, our library was built with support for embedded devices leading to better scaling of connections (think more connections in the same amount of memory due to less memory used per connection),  hardware acceleration support on a wide range of devices, progressive cryptography additions such as the first TLS library with TLS 1.3 support, and the outstanding support we offer.

For more information about the wolfSSL library or its ports, please contact facts@wolfssl.com.

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